Australian Bush Birds
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Galah  -  Cacatua roseicapillus
Galahs
Galah feeding, the orange/red eye indicates a female (Shepparton, Vic)
Galah Galah at Tom Price in Western Australia
map map The Galah - Cacatua roseicapillus - has a deep pink face, breast and underside merge into very pale grey tail and rump. Back and wings grey, possibly with darker grey wing tips. Crown is a paler pink, sometimes almost white. Females have a red iris; males have a brown iris. Several variants are defined by the colour of the skin around the eye but names of variants are not settled. Reaches 35 to 38 centimetres in length.
Galah - page 2
Galahs on wires
Galahs often gather on overhead wires. (Longreach, Qld).
Galah Galah
Left: Underwing colouring. Right: Red skin around the eye. (Batchelor, NT)
Galah Galah
Left: Galah alarmed by a kite quietly soaring overhead. Right. Grey skin around the eye. (Alice Springs, NT).
Feeds on the ground or low shrubs in small parties or flocks of dozens of birds. Lives in woodlands, open shrublands, grassland and parks. Common in country towns gathering on aerial power cables, especially at dusk. Found all over Australia.

Galahs are common throughout Australia, they have benefited from increased availability of water for stock and widespread production of grain since European settlement.

Galah - page 3
Galahs generally reach maturity at three years of age but may not breed if nest spaces are limited. Once pairs are formed they mate for life and use the same nest site repeatedly. Nests are usually in large, deep hollows of tree trunks or major limbs and lined with eucalypt leaves. Nests may be in cliff faces. A clutch of two to five white eggs is laid on gum leaves at the bottom of the hollow. Incubation takes a month; the young are fledged in six weeks and the parents abandon them after another six weeks. Mortality is high and half of all galahs hatched may not reach maturity.

The major threats to galahs are feral cats, birds of prey, goannas and snakes.
Galahs feeding
Flock of galahs feeding at Deniliquin, NSW.
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